Is My Cat Part Siamese?

Siamese cats have one of the most striking appearances of any house cat. Its dark face and light fur are immediately identifiable characteristics of this feline. Siamese cats are an exotic breed, but it’s gaining in popularity worldwide, and you can find them in homes throughout the six continents.

Siamese is a popular breed for mixing, you might have wondered “is my cat part siamese?” Your cat could have a Siamese lineage if they have the typical pointy ears and triangular face, blue eyes, and black face found in the breed or even having just some of those characteristics might indicate a siamese cat in your cats lineage. 

Siamese kittens are born pure white with a black face, with the coloring advancing as they get older. If you’re wondering if your kitty has Siamese genes, you can identify the cat’s habits and looks to get your answer.

Is the Siamese a Rare Cat Breed?


The Siamese breed originates from Thailand, where it emerged somewhere around the 14th century. The Siamese was originally a breed kept by the aristocratic elites and the Thai Royals.

The cat’s influence on Thai culture is apparent through the many drawings and written works of Thai scholars. Their work heralds the cat and its impact on the country’s elitist culture.

The social elite and royals would give Siamese cats as gifts to the leaders of nations they traded with, spreading the cat’s genetics around Asia and eastern Europe and as far as Africa.

While they were a rare breed some 600-years ago, today, the purebred animals are commonplace throughout the world.

The Siamese is ranked as the 12th most-popular cat breed in the United States. The Siamese is popular for breeding, and many mixed varieties display Siamese characteristics.

What are the Physical Traits of Siamese Cats?


If you’re trying to identify Siamese traits in your cat or kitten, the first feature to look for is the blue eyes. The Siamese typically has bright blue eyes. However, mixed breeds can have lighter or darker shades of blue, with an “ice-blue” color being fairly common in mixes.

The eyes are the standout feature in a Siamese. However, they also have slender faces, with a more pointed-look than other cat breeds.

If you have an adult cat, look for a light-colored body. While kittens are born white and gain color as they age, adults can vary from a sandy color to a light brown.

Siamese typically has a dark face, paws, and the tail’s tip also has a black color. This term, known as “point coloration,” is one of this breed’s defining visual characteristics.

If your cat lacks these point-coloration characteristics, it’s probably not a Siamese.

Most cat owners don’t realize the breed comes in two varieties; The traditional and modern Siamese.

The traditional Siamese features resemble its ancestors more closely than the modern breed. They have slender bodies, pointed, web-like faces, and the classic point-coloration with black faces, paws, ears, and tail tips.

The modern breed lacks the pointy-look to the face, with a more rounded effect. However, the modern Siamese retains the same deep-blue eyes and point-coloration.

Therefore, if your cat has green or brown eyes, there’s no chance that it’s a Siamese mix. The eyes are the dead-giveaway that there’s Siamese in your cat’s genetics.

Siamese cats are slender, and they typically weigh between 8 to 12-lbs, placing them in the median range for cat body weight.

The Siamese appears thinner than other breeds due to its short hair. It lacks the fluffy appearance of the ragdoll or Maine Coon breeds. As a result, the Siamese doesn’t shed as much as other breeds.

If your cat has long hair and sheds frequently, it probably has no Siamese lineage. Siamese doesn’t need much grooming like other long-haired breeds, and you won’t ever have to take them to the parlor for grooming.

Siamese also has long, slender legs, and they display a lithe movement when walking. We like to think of them as the supermodels of the cat world, giving the appearance of walking down a runway at a fashion show.

If your cat appears to stand taller than other cats, with longer legs than other breeds, there’s a good chance it has Siamese in its genetics.

Identifying Siamese Traits in Kittens


If you adopt a kitten, it’s challenging to discover if it has Siamese genetics in its early life stage. All Siamese kittens are born a snow-white color. As they age, they start to develop the signature black coloring on their face and extremities.

The white fur on the body slowly starts to turn a darker color. It might take three to six months before you start seeing the color appear in your cat’s fur. However, one color trait present from birth is the characteristic deep blue eyes found in every Siamese cat.

Kittens are born with color-sensitive enzymes in their hair follicles, giving a darker color at the extreme tires while the body remains lighter.

As a result, the color of your Siamese may depend on the environmental conditions in your country. The coloration may differ depending on which hemisphere they live in and the local climate conditions.

Do Siamese Cats Have Nice Personalities?


The Siamese has a reputation for being a friendly cat with a huge personality. One of the most interesting and unique features of a Siamese is its chatty behavior.

Some Siamese will sit next to you and have a conversation with you, answering your questions with a series of meows and vocal tones.

 Siamese meow frequently, and they use it as a communication tool to tell you when they’re feeling hungry or if they want to play.

Most owners note that their Siamese is incredibly vocal, and they often display moody behavior that’s not common in other cat breeds. As a result of this personality type, they might require more attention than other breeds.

Owners find that the cat can get moody and irritated if you don’t play with them enough. However, with the right activity level and playtime, your Siamese will love you forever.

The Siamese is also a breed with high-energy, and they’re particularly active at night. Many owners find it challenging to switch their Siamese cat’s behavior from nocturnal to diurnal.

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